Public charter schools do not create racial isolation, despite an assertion made by a recent AP review. Rebuttals by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools and Democrats For Education Reform (DFER) unravel the AP analysis claiming charters are driving segregation in public schools. In Texas, public charter schools account for 272,000 of the 5.3 million students, or less than 6 percent of all students enrolled in public education in our state.  The demand for more public charter schools is growing as a result of academic gains and not racial trends. Texas charters do serve larger proportions of poor and minority students as compared to their traditional school counterparts. When student demographics are compared, public charters enroll larger proportions of African American (+16 percentage points), Hispanic (+11 percentage points), and economically disadvantaged (+7 percentage points) students than traditional public schools. According to the most recent state performance reports, minority charter students outperform their traditional school peers in Reading, Writing, and Social Studies, and Limited English Proficiency charter students outperform in all subject areas. Parents and families choose public charter schools because they provide the best educational fit for their students.